Gallery

July Gallery Exhibition
Exhibit-Thursdays–Sundays | July 4-27| 12:00-5:00pm
Opening Reception July 6| 3:00-5:00pm
Gallery is closed the last Sunday of every month

Hoffman Center for the Arts | 594 Laneda Avenue | Manzanita
Free and open to the public

 

 

Featuring works by
Nanette Wallace, Phyllis Trowbridge, Randy McClelland

Nanette Wallace –Interlude

Nanette Wallace’s gestural monotypes are created as an emotional response to theworld around her, with an especially deep connection to water, light, and nature. She approaches her work with an emphasis on experimentation and intuition, allowing the spontaneous nature of the medium, most notably the monotype, to guide her. Nanette Wallace’s gestural monotypes are created as an emotional response to the world around her, with an especially deep connection to water, light, and nature. She approaches her work with an emphasis on experimentation and intuition, allowing the spontaneous nature of the medium, most notably the monotype, to guide her. Her monotypes are created using crude tools like q-tips, her fingertips wrapped in cotton cloth, and brayers to add and remove ink from a plexiglass plate. Once the image is complete it is then transferred onto paper by pressing the
plate and paper together using a printing press. The printing process yields only one unique singular print. Monotypes are often referred to as “the painterly print” since only one image can be created in the process. Monotypes are essentially an original painting, in ink, on paper. Nanette creates her monotypes and paintings from her home studio located in Portland, Oregon. Her career path also includes working as a graphic artist, illustrator, and letterpress printer. She is an award-winning artist, featured widely in solo, invitational, and juried exhibitions as well as print publications, nationally and internationally.

See more of Nanaette’s work here

Insta: @nanettewallace

 

Phyllis Trowbridge

The landscape has been always a central theme in my painting and a great deal of that has to do with the sense of time.  When I work outside in the landscape, as I usually do, I am taken with both its sense of timelessness and timeliness.  Everything changes and yet I am compelled to put down things quickly as I see them in this moment right now. It is a paradox that draws me in over and over again.

Much is lost and found along the way: there are moments of incredible frustration, such as losing something that made me happy, or more practically speaking, packing up before I am ready due to the rain or wind, but they are far outweighed by the rewards of being in the landscape itself – feeling the weather, sensing the deep space, watching the light change.

I have painted in Oregon for over three decades, often returning to the same places, sometimes mourning old trees that have come down, or affectionately remembering a previous painting outing. But sometimes I feel a sense of actual and impending loss at the effects of climate stress and the enormity and impact of the changes it is bringing to the natural world. Painting for me offers both an escape from and a face-to-face with these worries. Another paradox.

For now, I am grateful to present these paintings of the last few years – watercolors and oils – of some of my beloved and favorite places – the coast, Forest Park, Sauvie Island, my home garden. You can see more of my current work here

 

Randy McClelland – Hafu Potter

Hafu is a Japanese term used to refer to a person of half Japanese and half non-Japanese ancestry. I was born to a Japanese mother and an American father. I am deeply connected to my mother’s culture and the values that were passed down to me through my Japanese heritage. I am also drawn to American culture and the idea of pure and functional utility found in classic stoneware pieces from the 1800s. In my work, those ideas and cultural connections integrate using clay and local materials. My trust and experience with the wood fire process add a layer of depth. Finally, I owe much of the development of my skills to my friend and mentor, local ceramicist Richard Rowland, with whom I’ve worked and learned from over the last 24 years. For this body of work, I am inspired by my ancestors and my feeling that their spirits are always with me as I traverse the natural world.

Visit his website here

IG – @hafupotter

Click to view and download event flyer


  •  July 4, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 5, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 6, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 7, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 11, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 12, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 13, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 14, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 18, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 19, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 20, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 21, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 25, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 26, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm
  •  July 27, 2024
     12:00 pm - 5:00 pm

July Gallery Exhibition

Venue:  

Address:
594 Laneda Avenue, Manzanita, Oregon, 97130

Description:

Situated on the main street in Manzanita just a few blocks west of Highway 101, the Hoffman Center Art Gallery is located across the street from the North Tillamook Library.